Baking with friends

Baking with friends, Part 1:

I made a huge mistake. Around a year ago, I made some wonderful buns. They were absolutely the most delicious buns ever. I found these scrumptious little bits of cheesy goodness on a blog. They were supposed to be made with Cambozola which is a mixture of triple cream cheese and Gorgonzola. I set out to make them with what I hand on hand which was Blue cheese. When I ran short on Blue cheese, I made up the difference with Parmesano Reggiano. I was going to write a blog post about these wonderful buns and then I somehow forgot.

These buns, rich and delicious were so good, I never stopped thinking about them. Every time I had blue cheese I thought about these buns but the problem is Point Reyes Blue cheese. It is the most amazing cheese. Ever. When I have some in the house, I have a specific use for it and then any leftovers usually find their way onto several crackers and the cheese just disappears. The disappearance of this cheese is sorely to blame for why it has taken me so very long to make these buns again. Really, it’s true.

How did I get so incredibly lucky to find myself with a nice size wedge of Point Reyes blue just waiting for me to bake with it?  Wind. It’s the new weather pattern here in Santa Barbara.  We stop getting precipitation, then we get wind and for the past couple of unlucky years, fire. I was going to barbeque some blue cheese chicken burgers last week, but I waited until after 6 o’clock which is about when the wind starts. I didn’t dare strike a match. To me wind equals fire now, and I don’t want to have to evacuate a fourth time in three years. So I decided I was going to broil my burgers. I grabbed the ingredients and found out the hamburger buns got moldy. I just gave up. Which is good because we forgot to break out the crackers and gobble up that cheese.

Now, I had a problem. I never made notes about the buns. I didn’t even remember whose blog I got them from. I just remembered it was on YeastSpotting. So what did I do?  I went to the YeastSpotting archive and began to painfully look at each week until… I found it!! And whose blog was it? My friend Tanna’s blog (My Kitchen in Half Cups)! I had to laugh! I should have remembered.

Please make these buns and then go to YeastSpotting to see what else was baked by all of the talented bakers this week. And… keep reading after the recipe…

Blue cheese and parmesan buns

Adapted from Maytag buns found on My Kitchen in Half Cups

130 g whole wheat flour

136 g unbleached white flour

2 g salt

28 g honey

140 g sourdough starter

66 g low fat milk

66 g water

1 large egg, lightly beaten

58 g shredded parmesano reggiano

86 g crumbled blue cheese (good quality such as Point Reyes)

40 g softened butter

Olive oil cooking spray

In a large bowl, whisk together whole wheat flour, white flour and salt.

In another bowl, mix together honey, sourdough starter, milk, water, egg, parmesan and blue cheese.

Add wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Mix to combine. Add softened butter. Mix in. Transfer dough to a floured board. Knead lightly until the butter is well combined and you don’t see bits of it in the dough. Form a ball and transfer the dough to an oiled bowl. Cover with a dish towel and let sit for a half hour.

Using cooking spray, generously oil two six cup muffin tins. Divide the dough into twelve equal pieces. Form into balls and place balls in muffin cups. Let the dough rise until puffy and it fills the cups most of the way. Since I only used starter, no yeast, this took about four hours.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees, F. Bake the buns for 16 – 18 minutes or until browned. Cool in pans on a wire rack for about fifteen minutes. Remove buns from pans and allow to cool most of the way on wire racks. These buns are wonderful when they are still a bit warm from the oven.

Baking with Friends, Part 2:

 

There is a bread baking formula that is making the rounds on the Fresh Loaf. A lady named Flo Makanai figured out that you could make pretty great bread using the toss out from your starter.  Her formula is a 1, 2, 3 ratio of starter, liquid and flour. My friend John of the Lost World of DrFugawe made this bread over and over, getting fabulous results. Other folks on the fresh loaf are making it and getting fabulous results. I made it and I created a mutant loaf, deformed and tasting of wonder bread with a streak of raw dough in the middle and giant holes near the surface that caused the crust to burn. Horrible!!!!!!!!!!!!

I complained to my friend John, and instead of allowing me to cry on his virtual shoulder, he challenges me to bake ten loaves in a row until I get it right!!!! The nerve of my virtual friend! To be fair, he gave me instructions on how he has been turning out loaf after loaf of wonderful bread.

I started yesterday (this is a two day bread). My results were better this time, but still not good. My problem is that I hate, hate, hate the raw dough. It is sticky! I think I lost a third of the dough to the bowl, my hands, anything my hands touched and then the dough had the audacity to stick to the banneton, deflating itself before it made it to the oven.

But despite deflating itself, it did miraculously spring up in the oven. The outside crust was gorgeous. I got some big holes but they were on the surface again. I think I under salted the dough, it lacked flavor. But the worst part is it lacked flavor and texture. The crumb was springy like sandwich bread again, and there was no flavor at all. Just like sandwich bread.

I have to admit to a couple of shortcuts because this bread pisses me off, so I had no patience for it. I am going to list John’s instructions and then write down where I strayed. I know John will be back to mentor me. If anyone else wants to jump in with suggestions, please do so in the comments.

do a new loaf every day for at least 10 days – make improvements daily.

Loaf #1 down – 9 more to go!

use 100 g of starter – that’ll give you a 600 g loaf

I used 100 g of starter, 200 g water, 300 grams unbleached white flour for this loaf. I am thinking I need to use something besides water next time. Maybe sub out a little water for olive oil? Use milk instead of water? This should improve the flavor. Here is my problem. I remembered the salt, but after looking back at the kitchen mess, I could only find a ½ tsp. measuring spoon, I think I used ½ tsp of salt which is obviously too little. How much should I use??

use a tiny pinch of yeast too (tiny, tiny, tiny)

I don’t use commercial yeast. Other breads, no problem. This bread…

use minimal mixing – do fold and stretch in your mixing bowl – every 15 mins for 2 hours, then hourly.

I definitely have a short attention span. I did the stretch and fold every 15 minutes for about an hour.  Then I ate lunch.  Then I watched “The Next Food Network Star”, which I interrupted to stretch and fold at the two hour mark, I decided to keep doing the folds hourly but got bored three hours later, so I refrigerated the dough after around 5 hours at room temp.

you’ll need to heavily oil your bowl, and let it proof for 6/7 hours at room temp

The dough probably got some oil in it because I had to heavily oil the bowl each time I got the dough hermetically sealed to my hand.

Now form loaf, cover in plastic, and put in fridge, or I use BBQ grill on patio (works great!)

I formed it into as much of a ball as possible and put it in my banneton. Covered it in plastic and put it in the fridge for 16 hours.

in morn, heat oven to 475F for an hour

I heated the oven for as long as it would take to get my stone to 475F. My oven actually freaked out and got to more like 500F.

when oven is ready, pull cold but risen loaf from fridge or BBQ, score and bake immed. After 15 mins, lower temp to 450F, and bake for 20-30 mins more.

I baked even though the oven temp was 500F. The bread puffed up from it’s flattened state after I had to peel it off of the banneton. I actually put a pan with water in the oven for steam, which helped the crust formation. I lowered the heat after 15 minutes but only needed another 16 minutes before the internal temperature was way over 210F.

Now that I completed the exercise, here are my questions:

How much salt to use?

What sort of liquid should I use?

Should I use just white flour or add some whole grains?

How do I keep the dough from sticking to everything??

How do I shape this bread, the banneton is fighting with the dough!

So… At this point, I’m still not loving this bread but it seems to have potential so I’ll try it again. I’ll wait to see if anyone has any good ideas and then I’ll try your suggestions out next time. Thanks in advance everyone, and thank you John for making me get out of my comfort zone.

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12 Comments

  1. Tes said,

    June 16, 2010 at 5:21 am

    Baking is so fun, but I am not very confident with it. I love to try blue cheese and pamesan bun, it sounds yummy!

    • Mimi said,

      June 16, 2010 at 8:29 am

      Confidence comes with practice (which is why my friend wants me to rebake that bread ten times). Just bake what you love and enjoy the process! The result is a bonus.

  2. June 16, 2010 at 5:31 am

    my husband would love anything with blue cheese. Me, not so much. But maybe I could handle it in a roll.

  3. June 16, 2010 at 12:36 pm

    Beautiful advice: Bake what you love and enjoy the process! The result is the bonus. That’s excellent.
    And then there’s the practice and patience parts, those can be frustrating … but they do bring results … and then the bonus.
    Shoot, I need to make those blue cheese babies again. So good.

    • Mimi said,

      June 16, 2010 at 1:44 pm

      You do need to make them again! Try them with the parm. I haven’t tried them with pure blue cheese yet, but I suspect the parmesan helps mellow the flavor a little.

  4. chelsl said,

    June 16, 2010 at 7:21 pm

    Those buns look so ridiculously yummy! I am adding them to my must-try list. I can’t wait! Thanks for sharing!

  5. June 18, 2010 at 12:03 am

    […] Blue Cheese and Parmesan Buns […]

  6. ohiofarmgirl said,

    June 19, 2010 at 2:23 pm

    Fabulous! And ooohh… Point Reyes Blue… *sniff* Oh how I miss the West Coast cheeses! How funny is this – I just emailed the folks who make Humbolt Fog and begged them to tell me how they make it so I could try it here! They wouldnt (company secrets and all) but I got two very lovely replies from them.

    Say.. that reminds me.. I should go grab my bucket and give them goats The Squeeze… milking time!

    *Hogs and kisses*
    Your pal, OFG

  7. June 20, 2010 at 6:56 am

    The blue cheese and parmesan buns sound fantastic! I’ve never used my starter for buns, so I’d love to try this. Good luck experimenting with the loaf. I’ll have to remember to try a loaf 10 times before declaring it a failure. And, I’ll get more bread baking practice that way!

  8. yasmeen said,

    June 21, 2010 at 7:52 am

    Wonderful bakes :D

  9. Joanne said,

    June 24, 2010 at 5:31 am

    I hate it when I lose a recipe and have to backtrack across the internet to find it. I’m glad you did though, because those rolls sound fabulous! Thank god for wind!

  10. drfugawe said,

    June 24, 2010 at 10:31 am

    Hey Mimi,
    I’m back from my recent imprisonment, and pleased as punch that you’ve decided to give the 1,2,3 a retry. Here are my suggestions:
    * add a tiny pinch of instant yeast to the dough – all my best loaves have come from this addition.
    * by all means try other liquids – some will be better, some not so.
    * the standard thinking is that most breads require about 2% salt – for a 600 gm loaf, that’s 12 grams of salt (a goodly dose!). Yes, cheat on the salt, and you get less flavor.
    * this will sound counter-intuitive, but when the dough is proofing in the oiled bowl, use “wet” hands to do the stretches and turns – and handle as little as possible (two stretches and turns each time).
    * I’ve found that using rice flour in the banneton instead of wheat flour helps to reduce sticking – OR, let it have its overnight proofing right in the heavily oiled bowl, and when ready to bake, use a preheated dutch oven (with lid), as in the Bittman/Leahy “no knead” breads – all you need do then is to gently pick up your risen dough from the proofing bowl, and plop it into the preheated dutch oven when ready to bake! Result – beautifully risen and baked loaf.

    Break a leg, girl.


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